Holiday Reading

As soon as November arrives, I start my holiday reading. I love this time of year filled with lots of family activities and fun. I enjoy hunkering down on cold and icy days with a good book and a cup of tea. And I love reading holiday stories, old and new.

I started this holiday season with a short book from Miss Read’s Fairacre series (Fairacre #10). The Christmas Mouse was delightful, as are all the Fairacre books!

from Kirkus Reviews:

‘Twas the night before. . . and all through the house (will there be a dry eye?) in which Mrs. Berry lives with her daughter Mary and Mary’s two little girls (Mary’s husband has just passed on suddenly) there is still a twitch of expectation. But not for the creature who appears in Mrs. Berry’s room — with tiny pink paws, and goodness only knows she hadn’t anticipated the bedraggled little boy who turns up just before the day itself with its happy crinkle of packages. . . . Oh dear how dear, but then Miss Read’s own audience won’t be catnapping.

This was a kind and gentle story, a reminder of the things in life that really matter — family, kindness, acceptance, and love. A little book definitely worth reading on a cold November evening!

 

Quiet Girl in a Noisy World

Isn’t it terrific when you stumble across a book that seems to have been written for you personally? I found that book this morning in my library’s digital collection! Quiet Girl in a Noisy World: An Introvert’s Story, by Debbie Tung, is a graphic novel about introverts and how difficult life can be for those of us who are “quiet people.”

from the publisher:

This illustrated gift book of short comics illuminates author Debbie Tung’s experience as an introvert in an extrovert’s world. Presented in a loose narrative style that can be read front to back or dipped into at one’s leisure, the book spans three years of Debbie’s life, from the end of college to the present day. In these early years of adulthood, Debbie slowly but finally discovers there is a name for her lifelong need to be alone: she’s an introvert. The first half of the book traces Debbie’s final year in college: socializing with peers, dating, falling in love (with an extrovert!), moving in, getting married, meeting new people, and simply trying to fit in. The second half looks at her life after graduation: finding a job, learning to live with her new husband, trying to understand social obligations when it comes to the in-laws, and navigating office life. Ultimately, Quiet Girl sends a positive, pro-introvert message: our heroine learns to embrace her introversion and finds ways to thrive in the world while fulfilling her need for quiet.

I identified with so many different parts of this book. Here are a couple of my favorite panels:

 

 

This little book is important because in very positive ways it explains and validates the life experiences of an introvert. For many of us, it’s not easy being an introvert!

I’m going to buy my own copy of this book to share with my introverted daughter, my introverted son, and my introverted grandson, as well! Also, I have already preordered her new book, to be released on January 1, 2019. It’s called Book Love, and I already know I will love it.

October Reflections 2018

 

As Anne says in L. M. Montgomery’s timeless classic, Anne of Green Gables,  “I’m so glad I live in a world where there are Octobers.”  This October was a particularly beautiful one here in Oregon! It was also a wonderful reading month for me. I thoroughly enjoyed my reading for the Readers Imbibing Peril-XIII challenge, and Dewey’s 24-hour Read-a-thon.  Here are the covers of books read during this very successful reading month for me:

My husband and I also did a little bit of traveling this month. We spent a couple of days in the Seattle area where I met with my former teaching teammates and had a wonderful reunion lunch while Byron went on a bike ride. Also while in the area, he and I visited our favorite garden center, and the Yakima Fruit Market, and went out to eat at three of our old favorite restaurants. It was a great get-away!

We also spent a couple of days hiking in Silver Falls State Park. We enjoyed our first hike there so much we returned a week later and brought our daughter with us. We all loved hiking amongst  gorgeous the autumn colors.

So all in all, it was a just a great October!

RIP XIII Wrap-Up

Tomorrow ends this year’s Readers Imbibing Peril-XIII challenge. For me, this one has been the best and most enjoyable of all the RIP Challenges I have participated in over the years. I just loved my reading this time!

Here is my list of books read for my “Peril the First.” The ones I reviewed are highlighted and linked to the review post. A big Thank you to Heather (@capriciousreader) and Andi (@estellasrevenge) for hosting the challenge. Can’t wait until the next Readers Imbibing Peril time comes around again!

  1. The Whispering Statue, by Carolyn Keene
  2. The Silkworm, by Robert Galbraith
  3. The Eyes of the Amaryllis, by Natalie Babbitt
  4. This Rough Magic, by Mary Stewart
  5. The Seer of Shadows, Avi
  6. Death in the Castle, Pearl S. Buck
  7. The Keeper of Lost Causes, Jussi Adler-Olsen
  8. The Seventh Seal, Ingmar Bergman
  9. The Witches, Ronald Dahl
  10. The Coroner’s Lunch, Colin Cotterill
  11. Something Wicked This Way Comes, Ray Bradbury

Gray Day Reading

Living in Oregon means long months of dark gray skies and rainy days. I don’t mind the rain. It doesn’t stop my walking routine. “We’re waterproof,” says my walking buddy. But the endless days of gray are harder to bear. One way I deal with the grayness is to read gardening books. It’s a fun and educational gray-season focus for my reading, and I love the colors these beautiful books bring to gray days!

I Worried

I confess that I’m a worrier. I really have to keep reminding myself to just “let it go,” that worrying doesn’t get you anywhere!  This poem, by Mary Oliver, is so perfect for those of us who waste precious energy in the worry loop!

I took her advice earlier this week (before the rains returned) and this was what greeted me when I took my old body and went out into the morning. It was so much better than worrying!

 

It’s Up to the Women

Eleanor Roosevelt is one of my heroes! When I ran across her book, It’s Up to the Women…  “tips for living well”, I knew I must read it.  I loved the title, and expected the book to be much more political. It turned out to be more of a practical guidebook for women on how to survive difficult times during those Great Depression years. Although much of the book was dated, much of the advice was also timeless! She had so much respect for women, and her words were very encouraging and full of common sense ideas. The last few chapters of the book did deal more with women and politics.

“It is important that women think beyond the mere moment through which we are passing and acquaint themselves with all phases of life and conditions in our own country. I think we shall have fulfilled our mission well if when our time comes to give up active work in the world we can say we never saw a wrong without trying to right it; we never intentionally left unhappiness where a little effort would have turned it into happiness, and we were more critical of ourselves than we were of others.

When I was a little girl, my grandmother would often say to me, ‘You are a girl and I expect you to be more sensible and more thoughtful than your brothers.’ She was of the generation which did not demand so much recognition for women, but which accomplished many things by working through the men when they hardly knew they were being influenced. I do not mean for a minute that we should go back to the ideas of that generation or that women should return to the old status. I am merely pointing out that women, whether subtly or vociferously, have always been a tremendous power in the destiny of the world and with so many of them now holding important positions and receiving recognition and earning the respect of the men as well as the members of their own sex, it seems more than ever that in this crisis, ‘It’s Up to the Women!'”

I hope people will read it, understanding that life then was very different AND very much the same as now. Although it had some valuable and timeless parts to it, I’m afraid that I can’t recommend it without qualification. It was most interesting if you read it as a history of women and their roles in society, and in appreciation for the role Eleanor Roosevelt played in helping and encouraging women during that difficult time period. Our society and womens’ roles have changed dramatically since the 1930s and 1940s, so our sense what seems politically correct is also very different and must be kept in mind while reading this. I did appreciate the leadership and wisdom of Eleanor Roosevelt, and especially her reminder that women “have always been a tremendous power in the destiny of the world.”

Definitely one of my heroes!